Real-Time Creative Optimization Will Come To Native Advertising

Watch For These 3 Trends We Are Predicting to Breakthrough in 2017…

Native optimization goes “on-demand” with better research and creative tools:  

Native ads are comprised of dynamic, changeable parts and brands will want to optimize their creative assets while it still matters, instead of waiting for next year’s campaign. This speaks to the need for real-time creative optimization, or dynamic creative optimization.

Consumers read native headlines, even if they don’t click on them. It’s going to become important for brands to understand the true influence of their native ad copy decisions quickly—beyond mere clicks—and make adjustments to them while campaigns are still running. This means that this year, we’ll start to see a much more fluid collaboration between the people making the creative, the people studying the impact of that creative, and the platforms that the creative assets are running through. The entire process is speeding up and entering an on-demand era. 

In-feed native video becomes a premium video category for mobile:

Native video has proven itself as an incredibly powerful way for a brand to drive efficient video views and boost awareness of specific messages with accompanying headlines. Research has shown that brands can increase brand lift, message recall, and purchase intent in just seven seconds. This trend has combined with a general explosion in mobile video watching, especially among younger audiences, and has led to an overall increase in liquidity in the native video market. With the pipes in place for native video to be traded programmatically, this is bound to be a burgeoning area in 2017. Video will become the default setting for native advertising before too long. 

Creative strategy fully embraces the silent autoplay era on mobile:

According to the Martin Agency, 94% of the video ads it places on Facebook are viewed silently. Silent autoplay video has become such a dominant audience experience, both on and off Facebook, that a modern creative approach demands these elements be integrated into the experience. Brands have an “attention audition” now with silent autoplay video. Captions need to impart crucial information to people who scroll through the feed, and entice people to click through and watch the compete video. This year, I expect we’re going to see a much more sophisticated pairing of copy via captions—headlines and descriptions—which will increase the brand impact for people watching on silent autoplay

2017: An Exciting Time for Research Suppliers and Clients Alike

1)   Marketing spending will continue to move mobile.

As ad spending continues to target Millennial and Centennial consumers, the focus will be on mobile and video – where these generations are plugged in constantly. These types of advertisements require us to rethink current models of ad testing and incorporate newer technology that can track and monitor how the younger generations respond to advertising on mobile devices.

Location-based marketing will likely see a huge increase this year. Consumers, especially younger consumers, have developed the ability to effectively ignore marketing that does not directly apply to them. Successful brands and retailers will incentivize engagement with brands through personalized marketing that catch the consumer in their immediate reality (time and place). Consumers appreciate the personalized touch of location-based coupons and sale announcements. Continuing to understand how consumers use mobile while in stores or while out walking around will be a big focus of experience-based research this year, which leads to our next trend.

2)   Brands will increase efforts to measure the experiencing-self of consumers.

As brands increase efforts to measure the experiencing- self of consumers along with the remembering-self of consumers that has traditionally been measured, integrating the two becomes critical. Research methodologies like monitoring and ethnography need to be paired with data from survey research to better understand the full picture of what is going on with consumers.

3)   The new shopping landscape is “buy anything, anywhere.”

Consumers want immediacy and they want everything custom tailored. Older retail models that don’t buy into anytime anywhere are severely challenged in the new marketplace.

The new three-dimensional structure of buying channels requires a more robust research initiative into the various ways people consume in the “buy anything, anywhere” age. Consumers do price comparisons in stores, and then buy online. Conversely, some consumers decide on purchases online and have groceries delivered or have their goods delivered to their car curbside at Target.

4)   Big data keeps getting bigger.

Storage is cheap; processing is cheap – so cheap in fact that companies are able to house and store massive amounts of data for very little cost. Data collection devices have increased the pace of data creation, IBM estimates 90% of the data in world has been created in the last 2 years. Every transaction, every event imaginable is being logged and recorded. The silos between the data are being destroyed and with the adoption of Hadoop and NoSQL databases, storing, accessing, and combining vast amounts of data while still challenging is a tractable problem.

Big Data represents an enormous challenge for market research, which is historically based on comparably smaller, point of time data sets. While Big Data is certainly a disruptor that the industry is fully aware of, it also represents a tremendous opportunity for researchers to incorporate real insights from huge datasets with a wealth of information. When this information is shared, incorporating this performance data into research initiatives not only provides deeper context, but a more well-rounded story.

5)   As video consumption increases, so does ad spending.

Every statistic about video consumption is on the rise and shows no sign of slowing. YouTube boasts that partner revenue and the number of channels earning six figures on YouTube are up 50% year over year. Hulu, Netflix, and Amazon Prime continue to create compelling content that competes with the traditional networks.

Sure, video is important to consumers, but it’s also key for marketers and advertisers. The Online Publishers Association reports that four of five Internet users recall watching a video ad on a website they visited in the last 30 days. The majority of senior executives state they’d rather watch a video than read written text, according to Forbes Insight. Measuring engagement with video, particularly on mobile devices, is key to understanding its effectiveness on the target audience.

This year looks to be an exciting time for research suppliers and clients alike. As consumers expect a more tailored experience what they watch and how they shop both online and in store, the research providing deep insights into the consumer world will need to be flexible, customizable, and focused on the experiencing-self of customers. Continuing to find new ways to incorporate new technology while creating a cohesive story from a full range of research offerings is now more important than ever.  That’s why we work directly with business owners and their marketing teams to ensure that your business is seen, heard and relevant! 

How to save advertising dollars…

STOP WASTING MONEY!

Advertising and Marketing is a Top 5 expense for nearly all successful businesses.  Yet, most business owners, marketing managers and quite frankly, ad agencies, waste tens of thousands of dollars quarterly in their advertising campaign.  If you answer “No” to any of the questions below, you are wasting valuable dollars in your ad campaign.

  •  Are you composing and analyzing both qualitative and quantitative research with each media vendor to match up the most efficient programming with your target demographic?
  • Are you negotiating HUT levels, shares and ratings with your TV buys?  (All three must be negotiated to ensure proper efficiencies.)
  • Are you pulling radio station rating rankers for your demographic in each market that you’re advertising in?
  • Are you buying exact time periods with radio?  (Buying spots per week as a broad rotator is generally a bad idea.)
  • Are you getting 30%, or more, in added value or bonus with your paid media schedules?
  • Are you negotiating exact ratings per time period with radio and TV?  If so, are you then posting your schedules quarterly and holding stations accountable to audience delivery afterwards?
  • Are monitoring ad fraud in your digital campaign?
  • Is your digital campaign customized to each aspect of your business?  For example, if someone goes to a website for a university to get more information on online degree programs for nursing, but doesn’t fill out an application, is that university re-targeting Nursing Online Degree Programs back to that user?  You can insert any business.  You should be re-targeting back to people who visit your website with customized messaging highlighting what, exactly, they came to your website to learn more about.
  • -Are you composing your digital campaign based on behavioral, contextual and geo-fencing?
  • -Do you track and analyze which key words in your digital campaign are searched the most?  And then adjust accordingly?

Case Study: Relationship of Digital Video Viewership and TV Programming

Nielsen found…

The growing popularity of digital video finds more and more Americans watching TV content on desktops, smartphones and tablets. This change in how content is consumed has advertisers and agencies paying closer attention to the relationship between digital video viewership and traditional TV programming, and examining how emerging synergies between the two can be used to improve brand-building opportunities and boost campaign effectiveness.

YouTube commissioned a Nielsen study to explore the relationship between YouTube engagement and TV program viewership, and whether or not there is a direct correlation in viewing habits. Nielsen’s analysis revealed that there is in fact a positive connection between both YouTube views, uploaded TV content on YouTube and TV reach.

Key findings revealed a statistically significant relationship between TV reach and higher YouTube engagement among persons 18-years of age and older. The more people watched TV program content on YouTube, the more likely they were to tune into that show on linear TV. And conversely, YouTube viewership rose as TV program reach increased.

As digital video viewership continues to grow on platforms such as YouTube, advertisers, agencies and TV programmers have an opportunity to leverage the connection between digital views and TV audiences. This presents a valuable means to communicate brand messages to a wider audience, at the same time grow audience share.

Select this link for access to the entire case study.